Ida Know


Cjones09012021

Hurricane Ida hit Port Fourchon, Louisiana on Sunday with 150-mph winds. She’s now a tropical storm passing through Mississippi and headed toward the mid-Atlantic states. Over one million homes and businesses are without power in Louisiana alone. Flash floods and tornadoes may be created on her tour through the south. So far, she’s responsible for four deaths.

As bad as Ida is, she’s not Katrina. That category 5 hurricane hit Louisiana with 174-mph winds, destroyed New Orleans, and killed at least 1,833 people. Ida was a category 4, which is still extremely bad, but this storm hit smaller communities. Yesterday, people in New Orleans were sweeping up and going for bicycle rides (according to The New York Times). People in smaller communities, like Grand Isle, LaPlace, and Houma, are recovering from extensive damage. The storm was strong enough to reverse the flow of the Mississippi River.

There will be people left without powers for days if not weeks. Another major concern is access to drinking water. Rescue teams are being sent by the governors of California and Massachusetts. Hopefully, FEMA does better with Ida than it did with Katrina. The first damage FEMA is trying to repair are rumors that FEMA will pay for motel rooms. They will not.

There is also a wrong number for FEMA being shared on social media. If you need disaster assistance from FEMA, the correct number is: 1-800-621-3362. You can also apply at DisasterAssistance.Gov.

I don’t have a lot to give you today outside of a silly cartoon that pokes fun of FEMA and swamps. I’m from Louisiana so I can get away with making fun of swamps. Seriously, I hope there are no more deaths or injuries caused by Ida and hopefully, the storms created in its wake through the next few days will be light.

Signed prints: The signed prints are just $40.00 each. Every cartoon on this site is available. You can pay through PayPal. If you don’t like PayPal, you can snail mail it to Clay Jones, P.O. Box 9103, Fredericksburg, VA 22403. I can mail the prints directly to you or if you’re purchasing as a gift, directly to the person you’re gifting.

Notes on my book, Tales From The Trumpster Fire: here are SIX copies of my book in stock, which go for $45.00 each, signed. Also, I have copies of my first book from 1997, Knee-Deep in Mississippi available for $20.00.

Tip Jar: if you want to support the cartoonist, please send a donation through PayPal to clayjonz@gmail.com. You can also snail it to P.O. Box 9103, Fredericksburg, VA 22403.

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5 comments

  1. Hey FYI, Ida was far worse as to wind speed, not only landing at Cat4 but staying Cat4 for several hours (150MPH). When Katrina made landfall in southeast Louisiana on Aug. 29, 2005, its intensity had diminished but was still a major Category 3 storm. The damage in NOLA was primarily because almost all of the levee systems failed, causing flooding that could not be pumped out and, the pumping stations also failed, one reason being the generators were located on the ground floor which duh, flooded. Most of those deaths were from drowning… The good news this time is that most of the levees and floodgate systems put in after Katrina worked and held up.

    Like

  2. Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    “Hurricane Ida hit Port Fourchon, Louisiana on Sunday with 150-mph winds. She’s now a tropical storm passing through Mississippi and headed toward the mid-Atlantic states. Over one million homes and businesses are without power in Louisiana alone. Flash floods and tornadoes may be created on her tour through the south. So far, she’s responsible for four deaths.” — I don’t want to sound heartless but this takes me back to Hurricane Maía in Puerto Rico — that was really bad and all TFG did was through paper towels to the people there. Remember? That was painful to watch!!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Drought and fire here on the West Coast and floods and hurricanes in the Gulf and East – Pandemic all over. It feels like we are under siege. Thanks for the silly cartoon today and I really hope that FEMA and other emergency response efforts come through for the people.

    Liked by 1 person

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